Category Archives: Events

Lightning Talks: Jan. 11 Open Gov & Civic Tech Meetup Recap

For Open Austin’s first meetup of the year, six members of our community presented rapid fire lightning talks showcasing the group’s diversity of skill and knowledge.

The subjects ranged from introductory to technical. Presentations covered everything from online legal resources, web mapping, satellite imagery APIs, problem framing, City of Austin open datasets, and updates to Open Records Policy from the 84th Texas Legislative Session.

Highlights from Twitter. Give us a follow to stay up to date. 

Keep up with our future events and join our Meetup group to RSVP.
Also feel free to check out our calendar.

Ready to start working with us?
Join us on Slack now or check out our Github Idea repo.

 

 

Ship It Weekend 2015 Event Summary

The goal for our first ever Ship It Weekend was to create a comfortable space for teams and new civic hackers to push forward on existing projects. Our sponsors graciously provided fast wifi, good food, and coffee. All key ingredients for productive civic hacking.

Here’s a summary of some of the achievements of our various projects over the two day hack:

The Open Street Map (OSM) Import Team split public domain building data amongst 776 census block groups that represent an individual task (unit of work). They have now managed to finish 208 out of 776 tasks (about 25%).

Recycling ATX is a webapp for reporting buildings that do not comply with Austin’s Universal Recycling Ordinance. They extended the backend API and made progress on the front end of their app.

Texas Appleseed continued working on a map of discipline statistics by school districts in Texas. They worked on making it easier to filter map views on classroom removals and the use of school police and court to address student behavior. These map visualizations are being included in their new School-to-Prison Pipeline awareness website. The site is still under development but can be viewed on their demo host.

Screen Shot 2015-11-29 at 11.06.40 PMThe Open Data Progress Report got an upgrade to display better on mobile browsers.

The City of Austin Socrata Data Portal Analysis Team is building a program that fetches summary information from the City’s open data portal and organizes it for analysis. They refactored their code so that other cities can use it, and added a feature to fetch the list of resources from Socrata. As of right now, when you run the program, it generates a csv with summary data from the data portal. View their program Github.

The Digital ATX team is creating an inventory of programs and locations that offer computer labs and training offerings. They worked on some UI elements of the profile page, and location inventory page.

 

TScreen Shot 2015-11-29 at 10.45.38 PMhe Transitime team is making the deployment of the OpenAustin Transitime fork more stable. They created a simple Bash script to clean up the GTFS zip data provided by Capmetro.

Instabus is a webapp that shows where buses are in Austin. The team worked to modernize the Instabus code to use React, Immutable.js, and Redux. They also began a redesign of the user interface to work better on mobile.

Austin Park Equity aims to increase equitable park access with maps thatt help visualize how Austin’s park resources are distributed throughout the City of Austin. The team worked on a node.js script to import census data from CensusReporter.org and thought about data architecture to import park GIS data from a unified source (looking at you Open Street Map) to pair better with Austin Green Map.

The Open Austin Policy Team added some items to our Google Doc of upcoming policy priorities.

Screen Shot 2015-11-29 at 10.52.16 PM The Open Austin Logo design group created a bunch of doodles, sketches and drafts of a new OA logo.

The Open Austin Website Redesign group worked on turning design mockups into functioning templates for the header, homepage, blogs. They also began content migration of existing OA articles.

Thanks to everyone that came and participated at Ship It Weekend!

Ship it group photo

Smart Cities Meetup by CityUp, Aug 25

Date: Tue, Aug 25, 2015
Time: 5:30 – 7:30 PM
Location: Austin City Hall, 301 W 2nd St, 78701 (map)

Free RSVP link: here

(Open Austin is a member of the CityUP consortium, which is producing this event.)

Are you interested in meeting people who want to improve transportation, safety, health, education, economic opportunity, sustainability, environmental quality, and more by using technology, data, and analytics?

Smart city projects strive to advance all aspects of city life by using technology, data, and analytics to improve our understanding of urban design & planning, city infrastructure & operations, and civic issues & priorities. ‘Big Data’ is already transforming many industries and businesses, as well as education, research, and more. Smart city projects aim to collect data and use analytics to transform cities and the lives of the people in cities.

Austin CityUP™ is a new, comprehensive, city-wide consortium of companies, organizations, groups, and individuals that engage in smart city projects to advance Austin through digital technologies, data collection, analytics and modeling.

If you are interested in participating or just learning more, please join us for a smart city reception at Austin City Hall. You will hear about the upcoming plans of Austin CityUP™, learn about new opportunities, and meet people who are dedicated to transforming cities, and lives through the development, implementation, and operation of smart city projects.

Anyone interested in advancing and improving Austin is welcome!

Enjoy free snacks and drinks and bring your ideas and business cards!

Open Gov & Civic Tech Meetup, Aug 17

Date: Mon, Aug 17, 2015
Time: 6:45 – 8:45 pm (program starts 7 pm)
Location: Terrazas Branch Library, 1105 E. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78702 (map)

Invited Guests:
• John Clary, Spatial Austin
• Ryan Robinson, City Demographer, City of Austin Planning and Zoning Department

Topic: Austin’s Demographic Trands

Aug 18 update: Here are the slides from last night’s update.

First, John Clary will share his work visualizing Austin’s 10-One Districts, growth, affordability, and gentrification with D3.js, OpenStreetMap, & Leaflet.

Then, Austin’s City Demographer will share his perspective on Austin Demographic trends and some interesting features of the new 10-One Council District demography.

Open Austin hosts a monthly meet-up, to discuss local open government and civic technology issues. Our meet-ups are free and open to the public.  The meetup location is easily accessed by public transportation and has plentiful parking.

Open Gov & Civic Tech Meetup, Jul 20

Date: Mon, Jul 20, 2015
Time: 6:45 – 8:45 pm (program starts 7 pm)
Location: Terrazas Branch Library, 1105 E. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78702 (map)
Calendar: link

Invited Guest: Jay Boisseau, Vizias
Topic: Smart City Technology

Jul 27 update: Slides are here

A smart city uses digital technologies to enhance quality and performance of urban services, to reduce costs and resource consumption, and to engage more effectively and actively with its citizens.

Jay Boisseau will be our guest this month. Jay will talk about smart city technology, and how we might use this approach in Austin to create a better city.

Open Austin hosts a monthly meet-up, to discuss local open government and civic technology issues. Our meet-ups are free and open to the public.  The meetup location is easily accessed by public transportation and has plentiful parking.

Open Gov & Civic Tech Meetup, Jun 15

Date: Mon, Jun 15, 2015
Time: 6:45 – 8:45 pm
Location: Terrazas Branch Library, 1105 E. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78702 (map)
Calendar: link

Invited Guest: Miles Hutson
Topic: Developing a Crime API

Miles Hutson wanted to do analysis of crime information around the city. Although APD does post crime information on the open government data portal, it didn’t have all that he needed. Miles will discuss how he found the data he needed, scraped it from the web, and produced a new API for his analysis. He’ll share the results of his work and his analysis.

Also: ATX Hack for Change 2015 is one for the books. We’ll have an update on the event. We’d also like to invite any participants to come and briefly present their projects, and talk about their plans (and needs) to move it forward.

Open Austin hosts a monthly meet-up, to discuss local open government and civic technology issues. Our meet-ups are free and open to the public.  The meetup location is easily accessed by public transportation and has plentiful parking.

ATX Hack for Change 2015, Jun 5-7

logo-atx-hack-for-change-2014Date: Fri, Jun 5 – Sun, Jun 7
Location: St. Edward’s University, Austin, TX

Event site: http://atxhackforchange.org/

Join a multitude of other hackers, visionaries and civic-minded individuals at Austin’s third annual ATX Hack for Change. This is the city’s largest hackathon for civic and social good.

Local civic leaders will present pitches for the tools they need to fulfill their missions as agents of change in Austin. All you have to do is choose a challenge that fits your skill set, passions, and curiosity. Projects will address a wide variety of social and civic issues: anything from public transit to feeding the hungry, from helping protect the environment to promoting government transparency.

Last year’s ATX Hack for Change brought together over 200 civic and social innovators to create two dozen social good and civic applications and projects that continue to provide meaningful impact for Austinites across the city. Coinciding with the (National Day of Civic Hacking)[http://hackforchange.org/], this year’s event aims to bring even more diverse skillsets to the table to solve our city’s complex challenges — both tech-related and not.

IMPORTANT: You need to RSVP through the Eventbrite page to attend: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/atx-hack-for-change-2015-registration-16675343401

Open Gov & Civic Tech Meetup, May 18

Date: Mon, May 18, 2015
Time: 6:45 – 8:45 pm
Location: Terrazas Branch Library, 1105 E. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78702 (map)
Calendar: link

Invited Guest: Andy Wilson
Topic: OpenStreetMap!

May 20 update: Slides from Chip Rosenthal are here. Slides from Andy Wilson are here.

OpenStreetMap is a is a collaborative project to create a free editable map of the world. Users have the ability to add and edit features in the maps.

The City of Austin publishes copious geospatial data sets, including street address and footprints of all buildings in the city and surrounding areas. A group of volunteers is working to get this information imported into OpenStreetMap, so that it has accurate information and addresses for our city.

Andy Wilson will talk about the OpenStreetMap project and the effort to add City of Austin data to the map.

The meetup location is easily accessed by public transportation and has plentiful parking.

Open Austin hosts a monthly meet-up, to discuss local open government and civic technology issues. Our meet-ups are free and open to the public.

Open Gov & Civic Tech Meetup, Apr 20

Date: Mon, Apr 20, 2015
Time: 6:45 – 8:45 pm
Location: Terrazas Branch Library, 1105 E. Cesar Chavez St, Austin, TX, 78702 (map)
Calendar: link

Invited Guest: Nick Hadjigeorge
Topic: Data Portal Metrics

What can open data portal metrics tell us about how people use open data? At the April 20 Open Austin meetup, Nick Hadjigeorge will discuss an analysis of Socrata portal metrics and provide insights into how people are using open data on 14 Socrata portals.

The meetup location is easily accessed by public transportation and has plentiful parking.

Open Austin hosts a monthly meet-up, to discuss local open government and civic technology issues. Our meet-ups are free and open to the public.

Code Across Austin V: Civic Hack Summit Recap

Civic Hack Summit 2015Code Across Austin V / Civic Hack Summit was held on Feb 28, 2015. This event was part of national Code Across activity. sponsored by Code for America.

For this year’s Code Across Austin event, we decided to take a new approach to the conventional hackathon model. With the help of many community partners and dedicated volunteers, we believe we succeeded.

Conventional hackathons usually combine project ideation, development, and deployment into a single event. The result is one or two projects with real potential, while the rest fall by the wayside.

The 2015 Civic Hack Summit, in addressing the aforementioned pitfalls, was designed to produce a collection of plans for projects that could anchor a year-long civic hacking effort.

First, four guest presenters spoke about the potential for civic technology to improve the lives of Austin-area residents.

Austin City Council Member, District 4, Greg Casar spoke about the need for data-driven tools to enhance decision making at City Council. For example, we might know about areas in Austin with too few parks, but knowing exactly who and how many people are affected by the issue would strengthen any proposal for action.

Austin Monitor Publisher Michael Kanin shared his experience working with the City to release the raw data from the AMANDA database, the system used to track all permits relating to building construction, remodeling, and demolition. Kanin spoke of the importance of working with the City to reach shared goals, and outlined his plan for a using the AMANDA data to create a more user-friendly and accessible tool.

Chip Rosenthal, chair of Open Austin, provided attendees with a real example of what makes a hack-a-thon project successful. After several attempts to create a tool to connect lost pets with their owners, it wasn’t until the third iteration that the project successfully deployed. Why was this the case? Chip identified community need and resource opportunity as crucial elements for Pet Alerts’ success. The need for people to reconnect with their lost pets always existed, but before the third iteration, the data was unreliable. After the Pet Alerts developers reached out to the City, Animal Services began uploading its animal intake data to the City’s open data portal. The Pet Alerts developers were finally able to match the need with the opportunity, and recently deployed a successful beta application.

Finally, Eric Boggs from the Austin Center for Design, spoke about a unique approach to app development: human centered design. The approach consists of research, synthesis, and prototyping, with each phase incorporating information and insights about the intended users and their needs. These strategies are essential for creating community buy-in and maximizing potential for a successful hack project.

With all this information, six hours of time at the Iron Yard, and plenty of sticky notes, what did we achieve at the Civic Hack Summit? Seventy participants split into 6 groups and generated a wealth of problem statements. Then, each group selected their three favorite statements and presented them to the entire group. Attendees then self-selected into the problem statements they wanted to work on during the afternoon session.

To facilitate the move from a problem statement to a project, we hacked a tool commonly used in the agile methodology called the “business model canvas” with the help of the City and local volunteers. This new “Civic Tech Planning Canvas” gave attendees the framework to develop a successful project plan. As far as we know, this was the first implementation of the Civic Tech Planning Canvas at any hackathon.

Using the canvases, groups created 11 different project proposals within six policy themes, ranging from a noise ordinance mapping tool to a streamlined portal for accessing government services and forms.

  • Development & Land Use
    • Noise Complaints
    • Granny Flats
  • Transportation
    • City Paths Policy Report
    • City Path User App
    • CapMetrics
  • Sustainability
    • Zero Waste Attainment
  • Health & Social Services
    • 211 Data
  • Broadband & Digital Opportunities
    • Streamlined City Portal UX
    • Map My Broadband
  • Civic Engagement
    • Budget Out of the Box
    • Council Connect

But the hacking doesn’t end here. From now until the National Day of Civic Hacking, these projects will be available for the community to develop and refine using the information and ideas produced at the Civic Hack Summit. We were extremely impressed with the 11 projects, and our goal is to help these ideas grow into successful deployment.

If you’d like to connect with one of these projects, please join us at one of our periodic civic hack nights. The next hack night is scheduled for Monday, March 9. Or, join our email list to stay up-to-date on latest news and activity.